After a Decade, National Corvette Museum Unveils Sinkhole Exhibit

After a Decade, National Corvette Museum Unveils Sinkhole Exhibit

The National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Kentucky, recently unveiled a three-month temporary exhibit titled “Ground to Sky: The Sinkhole Reimagined,” which showcases the recovery of five Corvettes that were swallowed by a sinkhole that opened up ten years ago. The exhibit, which runs until September 15, features the restored 2001 Mallett Hammer Z06, the 1 millionth and 1.5 millionth Corvettes ever made, the ZR-1 Spyder, and the 2009 ZR1 “Blue Devil,” along with other artifacts that were consumed by the 40-foot wide, 60-foot deep hole in the Museum’s Skydome Hall of Fame.

The sinkhole incident made global headlines from 2014 to 2016, as the Museum worked tirelessly to recover and restore the damaged Corvettes. Situated in karst country, the Museum is located on top of a vast cave system in southern Kentucky, where the land is porous, and sinkholes occur due to shifting sediment and underground springs. The exhibit not only highlights the recovery of the Corvettes but also underscores the Museum’s commitment to preserving Corvette history and embracing progress.

Having had the opportunity to witness the sinkhole firsthand while covering the event for the Chicago Tribune, it was a remarkable experience to see the Skydome restored to its original condition and the recovered Corvettes on display. The Mallett Hammer Z06, still in its mangled sinkhole condition, serves as a poignant reminder of the incident. The exhibit also includes a viewing platform to observe the sinkhole and the boulder that damaged the Mallett Hammer Corvette.

As the Corvette continues to evolve with the introduction of models like the C8 Corvette and the upcoming electric Corvette, the Museum hopes that the “Ground to Sky: The Sinkhole Reimagined” exhibit will attract visitors and spark interest in Corvette history. It truly encapsulates the resilience and enduring legacy of the iconic American sports car.